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Georgia State Code
Title      15
Chapter       6  
Section Navigation        1 ... 9          10 ... 19    
    20 ... 28.1       29 ... 50.1  
  50.2 ... 59         60 ... 68    
    69 ... 77       77.1 ... 83    
    84 ... 90         91 ... 99      
Section1 2 3 4 4.1 5 6 7 8 9 >>>  
Title 15, Chapter 6, Section 9 (15-6-9)

The judges of the superior courts have authority:

(1) To grant for their respective circuits writs of certiorari, supersedeas, quo warranto, mandamus, habeas corpus, and bail in actions ex delicto;

(2) To entertain bills quia timet;

(3) To grant writs of injunction, prohibition, and ne exeat;

(4) To grant all other writs, original or remedial, either legal or equitable, which may be necessary to the exercise of their jurisdiction and which are not expressly prohibited;

(5) To hear and determine questions arising upon:

(A) Writs of habeas corpus or bail, when properly brought before them;

(B) All motions to grant, revive, or dissolve injunctions; and

(C) The giving of new security or the lessening of the amount of bail;

(6) To perform any and all other acts required of them at chambers;

(7) To hear and determine all motions to dismiss petitions for equitable relief, and all motions to revoke or change orders appointing receivers, after ten days' written notice has been given to the opposite party or his attorney by either party by service with a copy of such motion to dismiss or to revoke or change such order; and

(8) To administer oaths and to exercise all other powers necessarily appertaining to their jurisdiction or which may be granted them by law.

Saturday May 23 13:52 EDT


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